Insights from a Test Lab facilitator at StarEAST

I felt honored to have been invited to facilitate the Test Lab at STAREAST. Being my first Lab at this particular conference, I was lucky to have Bart Knaack, James Lyndsay and Wade Wachs there to ramp me up. They told me about their experiences with the Lab at STAREAST and gave me valuable insights from their personal kit of lessons learned. Their input helped me change the regular approach I had when running other Labs at EuroSTAR and BTD. Once again, context wins over pre-established “how to”s.

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Volunteering for CITCON 2016

The Continuous Integration and Testing Conference, abbreviated as CITCON, is an OpenSpace non-profit conference which for ten years has been organized in various cities around the globe. Currently, each year there are four editions taking place on four continents: Europe, America, Asia and Australia & New Zealand. The previous editions in Europe took place in London, Brussels, Amsterdam, Paris, London again, Budapest, Turin, Zagreb, Helsinki and this year in Cluj-Napoca.

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EuroSTAR Test Lab 2015

This November I attended the EuroSTAR Conference. The conference takes place once a year in different cities of Europe, and gathers around thousand people interested in testing. I was involved in running the Test Lab. Further on I will write about the Test Lab, in general and this year’s EuroSTAR Test Lab in particular, and then in the second part I’ll share how I felt at the conference and my takeaways. I will also insert the names and twitter handles of testers connected to the topics of this blog post, because I think that being aware of the ideas shared outside our workplace bubble, plays an important role in our career development.

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@adinnaplus Rapid Software Testing

The week starting with October 26th I attended the courses Rapid Software Testing (3 days) and Rapid Software Testing for Managers (1 day). It was brilliant! I feel I learned so many from both the course material and the trainer James Bach. Further on I’ll detail three things I learned and find valuable, and also mention other things I loved in this course.

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Adina: Bad habits during testing activities

I’ve been thinking about how to approach the subject of “Bad habits during testing activities”.

This concept of bad habits was very abstract to me and no bad or good habit came to my mind no matter how much I struggled. Then an idea hit me. How about I put myself in the context of testing something and observe my habits while I test? I may not pass through all the testing activities with this exercise, but it is a good starting point.

I’ll think about the test activities I had yesterday. Let’s see. Yesterday I did pair testing with my colleague Raluca. We were supposed to test a pretty straightforward feature, but the setup to get there was a bit tricky.

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Sketching Lessons Learned in Software Testing

The other days I was reading a very interesting book “Lessons Learned in Software Testing: A Context-Driven Approach – by Cem Kaner, James Bach and Bret Pettichord”.
I sketched some lessons that I found very interesting, mainly from the first two chapters “The role of the tester” and “Thinking like a tester”. Enjoy!

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How testing changed my mindset

Recently I came to the conclusion that my approach when testing is spread across most of my activities. It’s common for our work life to influence our mindset. The job-specific skills one develops remain in use when changing our environment. I find it hard switching them on only from 9AM to 6PM. Nothing new so far. So why bother reading this blog post? Due to its nature I believe that software testing is a very special activity. It involves a lot of unknowns which require mechanisms to deal with them. Then further mechanisms are needed to understand if the existing mechanisms are suitable in the current context. Below are some ideas picked up when testing. Let’s see how they changed my view of …

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Testing a sumoBot

Robot-sumo, or pepe-sumo is a sport in which two robots attempt to push each other out of a circle/ring (in a similar fashion to the sport of sumo).
The robots used in this competition are called sumoBots.

The challengesfor the sumoBot are:

  • to find the opponent (accomplished with IR [infrared], Ultrasound, Presence sensors)
  • to push it out of the flat arena
  • to avoid leaving the arena (usually by means of a sensor that detects the edge, e.g BW [Black & White] sensors)

Standardclass sumoBots: …

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